Arama They Didn't

9:17 pm - 12/26/2012

Shinzo Abe starts his binder full of women; taps two women for key posts in LDP

Move seen as attempt to gain support from female voters



Left Noda // Right: Takaichi

Incoming Prime Minister Shinzo Abe tapped two high-profile female lawmakers Tuesday for the top executive posts of the Liberal Democratic Party in an apparent effort to garner the support of female voters ahead of the Upper House election next summer.

The LDP named Seiko Noda, a former postal minister, as General Council chairwoman, and Sanae Takaichi as Policy Research Council chief.

Takaichi, a former minister tasked with handling issues related to the low birthrate, is the first woman to serve as the LDP's policy chief. The staunch conservative is opposed to giving long-term foreign residents local suffrage and has repeatedly visited the war-related Yasukuni Shrine.

Abe, set to become prime minister Wednesday, told reporters he chose Noda and Takaichi for the key party posts to demonstrate to voters the LDP's new outlook and to prepare for the Upper House election.

"Voters still have lingering questions over whether the LDP has changed," Abe told reporters Tuesday. "By appointing the two, I think we can show it has."

Abe noted that in the past, the top three LDP executives — president, policy chief and General Council chairman — were veteran lawmakers and faction heads.

He will retain Shigeru Ishiba as secretary general. Ishiba was a rival in the LDP presidential election in September, and secured the strongest support among rank-and-file party members.

Fukushiro Nukaga, a party heavyweight and head of the second-largest faction, was initially rumored to be a candidate for the General Council, which is nominally the party's highest decision-making body.

But Abe apparently put priority on boosting party popularity ahead the Upper House poll by tapping female lawmakers. During campaigning for the Dec. 16 general election, the LDP pledged to increase the number of women "in leadership positions in every area" of society to more than 30 percent by 2020.

Noda, 52, has long been regarded as a pioneering female politician in male-dominated Japanese politics. She caused a stir when she gave birth at age 50 through artificial insemination using an egg from a third party in the United States.

Meanwhile, Takaichi, 51, a long-time supporter of Abe, is a conservative who has emphasized traditional family values and opposed revising the law to allow women to keep their family name after marriage.

In an article she contributed to the monthly magazine Seiron in April 2010, Takaichi argued that allowing foreign residents, in particular Korean and Chinese nationals, to vote in local elections could cause serious national security problems.

With voting rights, foreigners could exert significant political influence over local governments and assemblies, thereby influencing national security affairs, Takaichi argued in the article.


Kishida

Meanwhile, Abe will appoint Fumio Kishida as foreign minister and Toshimitsu Motegi as industry minister supervising energy policy, sources close to Abe said Tuesday.

Kishida, 55, a former LDP Diet affairs chief, was state minister in charge of issues related to Okinawa and the Russian-held islands in Abe's previous government, which lasted for a year from September 2006, and the following government led by former Prime Minister Yasuo Fukuda.

Abe decided to give Kishida the post in the hope that his experience will help in achieving progress on the relocation of U.S. Marine Corps Air Station Futenma within Okinawa and in the long-standing territorial dispute with Russia, the sources said.

As trade minister, Motegi, 57, a former financial services minister, will deal with the issues including whether to continue relying on nuclear energy and participating in the Trans-Pacific Partnership free-trade talks.



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Noda and Takaichi seem like opposites in beliefs. I really hoped it doesn't turn the case with Korea's first female president, Park Geun-hye. Also it's crappy that he's doing this just to win votes.
lady_mercury 27th-Dec-2012 02:20 am (UTC)
What's even sadder is how the people of this country honestly don't care so shit like this can happen.
45s 27th-Dec-2012 02:34 am (UTC)
Legit lol at the title
haruno21 27th-Dec-2012 03:27 am (UTC)
ide want to think to what else Takaichi opposes to *heavy sigh*

2 decorative figures there...WOW women can be sure things have changed for them *more heavy sighs*
dearmisterecho 27th-Dec-2012 06:20 am (UTC)
The staunch conservative is opposed to giving long-term foreign residents local suffrage....

Takaichi argued that allowing foreign residents, in particular Korean and Chinese nationals, to vote in local elections could cause serious national security problems.


Fuck you, lady.

Yeah, not surprised these backward ass chicken-hawk conservative douchenozzles would try to pander to women in this way.
dramaticsurgeon 27th-Dec-2012 11:42 am (UTC)
"Meanwhile, Takaichi, 51, a long-time supporter of Abe, is a conservative who has emphasized traditional family values and opposed revising the law to allow women to keep their family name after marriage.

In an article she contributed to the monthly magazine Seiron in April 2010, Takaichi argued that allowing foreign residents, in particular Korean and Chinese nationals, to vote in local elections could cause serious national security problems."

Way to take a step (or several) back in time, Japan. Also finding it suspect that they HAD to single out Korean and Chinese residents in that statement.

It's just small things...for now. My concern is that, through these smaller issues, this "traditional" party is going to strip the nation of the little progress it's already made towards women's rights and immigration. If they want to survive as a country, one or the other will have to move forward almost at the speed of light--not be further impeded by shortsighted politicians.

Edited at 2012-12-27 11:44 am (UTC)
lady_mercury 27th-Dec-2012 01:18 pm (UTC)
Well, the reason why they singled out Korean and Chinese residences is because it is directly related to them. Chinese and Koreans who do not change their names to Japanese in order to become a citizen are considered to be a foreigner. Even if they were born and raised in Japan, just because they never changed their names, they are not considered to be Japanese.

It's fucking bullshittery. The xenophobic bullshit attitude that this country has is like you have to actually be here to witness the brunt of it. You don't get it in the city, of course not, but in the boondocks? Hooooly fuck.

But, you see, the Japanese don't vote for their prime minister. The prime minister is determined by the power in the lower house so, to the Japanese, it doesn't really matter to them. They don't vote because they figure their voice won't matter anyway. Not only that these people really don't have much faith in their politicians anyway. Being here for this election was bizarre...

Edited at 2012-12-27 01:20 pm (UTC)
dramaticsurgeon 27th-Dec-2012 02:16 pm (UTC)
All excellent points, and I had no idea about Chinese/Korean immigrants not being recognized citizens if they don't change their names. I *have* heard from a permanent American resident that she refuses to become a citizen as her Western looks mean she will always be considered a foreigner, as will her Japan-born child.

And yes, it is rather disturbing how the citizens feel so powerless that they just ignore what these out-of-touch politicians do. Low childbirth rate? Rather than supporting working or single mothers, let's expend our energy arguing over an archaic law about family names and registries. Surely that will encourage women to have kids. (I know it's an exaggeration, but not by much.) A country should be run however its inhabitants choose, but when those inhabitants are slowly dying off you would think they'd do something other than isolate themselves even more. Someone somewhere should have thought "this isn't working" by now.
haimazn 27th-Dec-2012 06:03 pm (UTC)
It's so annoying, one of my best friends is a born and raised in japan "korean", and he's never seen himself as korean, but still cant vote and gets treated as a foreigner. My bf's brother wants to run a campaign with "foreign" looking japanese people, with the title "I am Japanese." Idk how many times both my bf and his brother get told "You're not japanese" just because they are half.
mister_robatto 27th-Dec-2012 05:53 pm (UTC)
just here for the title
baboona 27th-Dec-2012 10:52 pm (UTC)
takaichi can gtfo
neurotic_rat 29th-Dec-2012 03:56 pm (UTC)
I had a hard enough time trying to understand politics in Japan while watching TV, that I ended up not voting (and really, who can you trust in all this?) and damn misogynist Abe gets elected. It really is a shame, because I WANTED to vote, but because of language barriers (being a Japanese-American that was deprived of understanding advanced forms of Japanese just sucks), I couldn't understand who was damn conservative and backwards nor understand what their policies are.

And really? Hiring these two women is going to make women vote? Well, as a Japanese woman, that isn't going to make me vote for them because I am against what their views are.

So, FUCK YOU ABE SHINZO!

Edited at 2012-12-29 04:02 pm (UTC)
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